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What if my abusive partner is charged with a crime?

Question
What if my abusive partner is charged with a crime?

Glossary

Clear language definitions to common legal terms. 

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Reviewed: 
May, 2016
Answer

If you or someone else calls the police about your partner's abuse, the police decide what happens. You do not decide.

If the police think that there are "reasonable grounds" to believe that someone committed a crime, they must charge that person with a crime. So, they may charge your partner, charge you, or charge both of you, with a crime.

There is always a chance that you will be charged, even if you are the abused partner.

The police will talk to both you and your partner, and look for other evidence before deciding if they should charge either or both of you with a crime.

If your partner is charged, the police should help you find services for victims of crime so you can get some support after the police leave. The police will probably take your partner to the police station.

Your partner might be released by the police or the court. They will usually have to follow certain conditions. These conditions are the rules your partner must follow after being released by the police or the court.

It might take a long time before the criminal court process is completed. Someone from the Victim/Witness Assistance Program at the criminal court should stay in touch with you to keep you updated.

If you're afraid of your partner, you should think about making a safety plan to keep you and your children safe.

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