glossary

Glossary

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Title: accommodation
Body:

Ontario's Human Rights Code says that employers must do what they can to remove barriers that discriminate against people in a way that goes against their human rights. The legal word for this is accommodation.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer will not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

Title: appeal
Body:

To appeal means to ask a higher level of decision maker to review a decision by your case manager that you don't agree with. The higher level decision maker at the WSIB is called an Appeals Resolution Officer.

Body:

In an averaging agreement, you agree to get overtime on the average number of overtime hours you work over 2 weeks or more, not the actual number of hours.

In most jobs, the hours you work over 44 hours a week are overtime hours. And for those hours you get paid 1 ½ times your regular wage.

To average your overtime hours over a certain number of weeks, take the total number of hours you worked in that period and divide by the number of weeks in that period.

Then subtract 44 hours from the total and multiply by the number of weeks in the period to figure out the overtime hours you'll have.

Body:

In an averaging agreement, you agree to get overtime on the average number of overtime hours you work over 2 weeks or more, not the actual number of hours.

In most jobs, the hours you work over 44 hours a week are overtime hours. And for those hours you get paid 1 ½ times your regular wage.

To average your overtime hours over a certain number of weeks, take the total number of hours you worked in that period and divide by the number of weeks in that period.

Then subtract 44 hours from the total and multiply by the number of weeks in the period to figure out the overtime hours you'll have.

Body:

A bargaining unit is a group of employees that is represented by a union.

Title: Case Manager
Body:

A Case Manager is the person at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) who first deals with your claim. Their name will be on the first letter you get from the WSIB.

The Case Manager is your contact person at the WSIB when you have questions and they are responsible for making decisions about your claim.  

Sometimes your Case Manager will change. But if you have your claim number, you can find out who the new person is.

Body:

A claim number is the unique number that the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) gives to each injury you report. It’s on the first letter that you get from the WSIB and all other WSIB documents about your injury.

Body:

When a workplace includes workers who belong to a union, a collective agreement sets out conditions of employment, such as wages, hours of work, and overtime pay. The collective agreement includes the process that workers need to use if the employer does not follow the agreement.

Body:

Collective bargaining is the process that unionized workers and employers go through to set the conditions of employment, such as wages, hours of work, and overtime pay.

Body:

Constructive dismissal happens when your employer makes a fundamental change to your work situation and you don't agree or accept it. Because of this, your work or your conditions at work change so much that it's like you've been fired.

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