glossary

Glossary

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Title: affirmation
Body:

When a person makes an affirmation, they give a formal promise that a statement is true. An affirmation may be used in place of an oath. For example, an affirmation may be used when a person isn’t able to take an oath because of religious reasons.

Title: assets
Body:

Assets are things that you own. For example, assets include cars, real estate, registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs), and any savings you have.

Body:

A Certificate of Judgment is proof that you have a court order you can enforce. It’s usually used if you need to enforce an order in a different court than where you got the original order.

Title: co-owner
Body:

A co-owner of a debt is someone who owns part of the money that a person is owed. For example, two people who share a joint bank account are co-owners of the debt.

Body:

Contempt of court is when someone does not listen to or respect the court, judge, or other person in a legal proceeding. It can include not following orders, refusing to co-operate with the judge, and lying. You can be fined or sent to jail if you are in contempt of court.

Title: court clerk
Body:

The court clerk is a person at the courthouse responsible for things like issuing documents, maintaining court files, and setting court dates.

Title: creditor
Body:

A creditor is a person or business who is owed money by a debtor. For example, if you have a court order against someone to pay you money, you are a creditor.

Title: damages
Body:

Damages is money awarded by the court to make up for injury or loss that a party suffered.

Title: debtor
Body:

A debtor is someone who owes money. For example, a debtor can be someone who owes money because of a court order from a Small Claims Court.

Title: debts
Body:

Debts are money that a person owes, for example, a mortgage, line of credit, or car loan.

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