glossary

Glossary

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An absolute discharge is a type of sentence. Absolute discharge means that the court found you guilty, but decided not to punish you in any other way. You don’t get a criminal record. Absolute discharges are automatically removed from the Canadian Police Information Center computer system 1 year after the court’s decision.

Title: access
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Access is the time a parent spends with a child they usually don't live with. Access can be on a strict schedule, such as every other weekend, or on a flexible schedule, such as whenever the parents agree. In some cases, a parent might have supervised access where someone else watches the visit.

Access also includes the right to get information on the child's health, education, and well-being. Getting information is not the same thing as making major decisions about the child.

Other people, for example, grandparents, can also apply to the court for access.

Title: accommodate
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Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers and landlords must do what they can to remove barriers that cause barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

Title: accommodation
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Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers and landlords must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

 The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability. 

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship. 

Title: acquittal
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An acquittal means that the court found you not guilty.

Title: adjourned
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If your case is adjourned, it will be finished in court for that day, and will continue on a future date. You will have to come back to court for your next court date.

Title: adjournment
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An adjournment is when your day in court is cancelled and rescheduled for another date. This can happen for many reasons, for example, if you aren’t ready to go to court or the court does not have time to hear your case on a particular day.

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The administration of justice is the process through which the justice system works. It includes the people, activities, and organization of the justice system. It is used to find, investigate, arrest, and try people suspected of committing a criminal offence.

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An adoption consent is a document a parent signs that says they agree to place their child for adoption. The document must be signed in front of a lawyer.

If the child being adopted is 7 years or older, they also have to agree to their adoption. The child meets with a lawyer from the Office of the Children’s Lawyer before signing a consent.

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Advice counsel are private lawyers or Legal Aid Ontario staff lawyers located in all family courts who give basic information on family law to anyone who wants information. For example, advice counsel can explain legal terms, how to start or respond to a court application, and the court process.

If your income is low enough, advice counsel can also give you legal advice about child custody and access, child support and spousal support, dividing property, divorce, and most other family law matters.

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