Glossary - Housing Law

remedies

In Housing Law

A remedy is an order made by a court or tribunal to give someone their legal rights or to compensate them for their rights not being respected. For example, if a landlord is not doing repairs that are needed, the Landlord and Tenant Board could order the landlord to do the repairs, lower the tenant’s rent until the repairs are done, or let the tenant move out with short notice. Usually a tenant or landlord can ask the Board for certain remedies by filing an application with the Board.

remedy

In Housing Law, Human Rights

A remedy is an order made by a court or tribunal to give someone their legal rights or to compensate them for their rights not being respected.

For example, if a landlord is not doing repairs that are needed, the Landlord and Tenant Board could order the landlord to do the repairs, lower the tenant’s rent until the repairs are done, or let the tenant move out with short notice.

Or, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal might order an employer to change their policy manual to deal with discrimination in the workplace.

restraining order

In Criminal Law, Family Law, Housing Law

A restraining order is a court order that limits what a person can do in any way the family court thinks is appropriate to your situation. The order might limit where a person can go, or who they can contact or communicate with. For example, it can say one or more of these things:

  • your partner cannot come within 500 metres of you and your children
  • your partner cannot talk to or contact you or your children except through an agency or another person
  • your partner cannot come within 500 metres of your home and work
retirement home

In Housing Law

A rented place to live where the residents can get at least 2 care services, most of them are at least 65 years old, and there are at least 6 residents (not counting anyone related to the landlord). Retirement homes are considered care homes, and people who pay rent there are tenants. They are also covered by many other rules in a law called the Retirement Homes Act.

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