Glossary - COVID-19

accommodation

In COVID‑19 Education, Education

Accommodation means the help that a school or school board has to give a student who has more than the usual amount of difficulty learning or taking part in school. Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that school boards must do what they can to help students with conditions or differences that affect their ability to learn. In human rights law, these conditions or differences are called “disabilities”. But in schools, these differences or conditions are called “exceptionalities”.

There are 4 types of exceptionalities:

  1. Behavioural, such as ADHD, depression, anxiety, or Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  2. Communicational, such as autism, trouble hearing or speaking
  3. Intellectual, including moderate intellectual delays (MID), severe developmental disabilities (DD), and giftedness
  4. Physical, such as trouble seeing or moving around
declaration

In COVID‑19 Housing Law, Evictions, Rent, Health and safety, Privacy, Getting help in Housing law, Legal help and information, Working with your lawyer, Making a complaint, Housing Law, Housing Law, COVID-19, Evictions, Rent, Health and safety, Privacy, Renting a new place to live, Leases and agreements, Rent, fees and deposits, Discrimination, Paying rent, Rent deposits, Rates and increases, Behind or unable to pay rent, Lease ending, Repairs and maintenance, Landlord and tenant responsibilities, Heat and utilities, Repairs, Complaints, Privacy and harassment, Harassment, Locks, Guests, Cutting off services, Human rights in housing, Types of discrimination, Human rights complaints, Moving out, Getting out of a lease or rental agreement, Giving notice, Lease ending, Home sold, Retirement or care homes, Rent deposit, Your belongings after you move out, Eviction, No-fault eviction, Eviction for tenant conduct, Eviction because of rent, Lease ending, Home sold, Eviction process at the Landlord and Tenant Board, Eviction orders , Eviction hearings, Eviction notices, Tenant applications to the Landlord and Tenant Board, Settling your case, Hearings at the Landlord and Tenant Board , How to apply to the Board , Issues the Board can deal with, Tenant organizing, Getting legal help in Housing Law, Legal help and information, Working with your lawyer, Making a complaint, Discrimination in housing, Human rights complaints, Rental Applications, Disability

A declaration is a written statement. The person making the statement must sign it. They must also promise that:

  • the statement is true,
  • there’s nothing misleading or false in it, and
  • they have not deliberately forgotten to include any important information.
Power of Attorney for Personal Care

In COVID-19, COVID‑19 Wills and Powers of Attorney, Abuse and Family Violence, Elder abuse, Health and Disability, Elder Abuse, Wills and Powers of Attorney, COVID-19, Wills, Power of Attorney for Property, Power of Attorney for Personal Care

A Power of Attorney for Personal Care is a legal document that lets you name someone to make decisions for you if you become mentally incapable. It’s sometimes called a “personal power of attorney”.

You’re called the grantor. The person you name is called your attorney.

Your attorney can make:

  • decisions about your personal care, such as where you live, what you eat, getting dressed, washing and having a bath, and staying safe
  • decisions about your health care that deal with:
    • health-care treatments
    • moving into a long-term care home
    • personal care services in a long-term care home
Power of Attorney for Property

In COVID-19, COVID‑19 Wills and Powers of Attorney, Abuse and Family Violence, Elder abuse, Health and Disability, Elder Abuse, Wills and Powers of Attorney, COVID-19, Wills, Power of Attorney for Property, Power of Attorney for Personal Care

A Power of Attorney for Property is a legal document that lets you name someone to deal with your money and property. You’re called the grantor. The person you name is called your attorney.

Your attorney can make decisions, such as:

  • doing your banking
  • signing cheques
  • buying, selling, or leasing real estate
  • buying consumer goods and services

They cannot:

  • make or change your will
  • make or change who’s a beneficiary on your insurance policy or a registered plan, such as your registered retirement savings plan (RRSP)
  • make a new Power of Attorney for you

A Power of Attorney for Property can start working as soon as you sign it. Or, you can set limits. For example, you can make a Power of Attorney that lets your attorney only sign documents that are needed to sell your home or that lasts only while you’re on vacation.

safety plan

In COVID‑19 Abuse and Family Violence, Abuse and Family Violence, Elder abuse, Domestic violence

A safety plan is a list of actions that someone can take to avoid dangerous situations or if they’re in danger.

Safety plans usually include ways for someone to stay safe:

  • when they’re in a dangerous, risky, or abusive relationship,
  • when they’re planning to leave, and
  • after they leave the relationship.
severance pay

In COVID-19, COVID‑19 Employment and Work, Employment and Work

Severance pay is not the same as termination pay or pay in lieu of notice. The Employment Standards Act gives some people the right to severance pay when they lose their jobs.

You get severance pay only if you’ve worked at least 5 years for your employer and:

  • your employer pays wages of at least $2.5 million a year, or
  • at least 50 people will be losing their jobs within a 6-month period because the business is being cut back.

The basic rule is that severance pay is one week’s pay for each year you’ve worked for your employer, up to 26 weeks.

substitute decision-maker

In COVID-19, COVID‑19 Wills and Powers of Attorney, Abuse and Family Violence, Abuse of people with disabilities, Elder abuse, Health and Disability, Elder Abuse, Mental health, Wills and Powers of Attorney, COVID-19, Wills, Power of Attorney for Property, Power of Attorney for Personal Care

A substitute decision-maker (SDM) is someone who can make personal care decisions for you when you’re not mentally capable. This includes decisions about where you live, what you eat, getting dressed, washing and having a bath, and staying safe. This might be the attorney you name in your Power of Attorney for Personal Care.

The Health Care Consent Act says who can be SDMs for health-care decisions. This includes situations where a doctor finds that you’re not capable of making your own decisions about medical treatment.

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