Glossary - Health and Disability

accommodate

In Employment and Work, Health and Disability, Housing Law, Human Rights, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal differences include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

accommodation

In Employment and Work, Health and Disability, Housing Law, Human Rights, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

 The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability. 

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship. 

Canada Pension Plan (CPP)

In Health and Disability, Income Assistance, Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits

The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is run by the Canadian government. Employers and workers make contributions to the plan and in certain situations the benefits are paid out to the worker or their family to partially replace their earnings.

These situations can include:

You may also get these benefits by credit splitting after a common-law relationship, divorce, or separation, even if you are not a worker.

caregiver

In Abuse and Family Violence, Abuse of people with disabilities, Elder abuse, Health and Disability, Home care, Long-term care, Home care, Long‑term care

A caregiver is someone who looks after people who need care, for example, an older adult, a child, or a person with a disability.

Caregivers can be family members, health-care practitioners, friends, paid helpers, or social workers. They work with people in their own homes, retirement homes, long-term care homes, and other health-care settings.

Children’s Aid Society

In Health and Disability, Mental health

The Children’s Aid Society (CAS) is an organization that has a legal duty to make sure that children are protected from harm. The government has given them this job. In some places in Ontario, CAS is called Child and Family Services.

Community Treatment Order

In Health and Disability, Mental health

A Community Treatment Order (CTO) is an official order from a doctor that allows a person who has a serious mental disorder to be treated for it while living at home. Without a CTO, that person would be forced to live in a psychiatric facility and be treated there.

CPP disability benefits

In Health and Disability, Income Assistance, Ontario Disability Support Program, Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits are for people who:

  • have a severe and prolonged disability that prevents them from working regularly or earning more than a limited amount of money
  • are under 65 years old
  • contributed enough to CPP
CPP pension contributions

In Health and Disability, Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits

Workers make contributions to the Canada Pension Plan. If you work for an employer, these are deducted from your pay cheques. Employers also make contributions to the Canada Pension Plan on behalf of their employees.

The amount of your retirement pension or disability benefit is based on a few things, including:

  • the amount you contributed to your plan,
  • how long you contributed for, and
  • the age you retire at.
CPP retirement pension

In Health and Disability, Ontario Disability Support Program, Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits

A Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension is a monthly payment that many Canadians get when they retire.

To get a CPP retirement pension, you normally have to have:

  • worked in Canada
  • made contributions to the CPP

You may also get a CPP retirement pension if you didn’t work in Canada or contribute, but have enough contributions because of a divorce or separation. This can happen if you split your pension contributions with your former partner.

You can get a CPP retirement pension when you’re 65 years old. Or, you can start your CPP retirement pension:

  • as early as 60, and get less money each month
  • as late as 70, and get more money each month
detained

In Health and Disability, Mental health

If you’re detained, it means you’re not allowed to leave a place such as a psychiatric facility or jail. It means you have to stay there even if you don’t want to. The law gives some people, such as the police or your doctor, the right to detain you in certain situations. For example, if you’re likely to seriously hurt yourself or someone else.

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