Glossary - Income Assistance

accommodate

In Employment and Work, Health and Disability, Housing Law, Human Rights, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal differences include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

accommodation

In Employment and Work, Health and Disability, Housing Law, Human Rights, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

 The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability. 

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship. 

Allowance

In Income Assistance

The Allowance is a monthly amount that the Canadian government pays to Canadian citizens and legal residents who:

  • have a low income,
  • are 60 to 64 years old, and

are married to, or the common-law partners of, people getting Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement.

Allowance for the Survivor

In Income Assistance

The Allowance for the Survivor is a monthly amount that the Canadian government pays to Canadian citizens and legal residents whose spouse or common-law partner has died and who:

  • have a low income,
  • are 60 to 64 years old, and

meet the minimum residency requirements.

assets

In Family Law, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts, Wills and Powers of Attorney

Assets, sometimes called property, are things that you own. For example, assets include cars, real estate, registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs), and any savings you have.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP)

In Health and Disability, Income Assistance, Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Canada Pension Plan (CPP) disability benefits

The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is run by the Canadian government. Employers and workers make contributions to the plan and in certain situations the benefits are paid out to the worker or their family to partially replace their earnings.

These situations can include:

You may also get these benefits by credit splitting after a common-law relationship, divorce, or separation, even if you are not a worker.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement benefits

In Income Assistance, Canada Pension Plan (CPP)

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement benefits are monthly payments that many Canadians get when they retire.

To get CPP retirement benefits, you normally have to have:

  • worked in Canada
  • made contributions to the CPP

Most people who get CPP retirement benefits get them when they are 65 years old. But you can start getting your retirement benefits:

  • as early as 60, and get less money each month
  • as late as 70, and get more money each month
Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension

In Income Assistance, Canada Pension Plan (CPP)

A Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension is a monthly payment that many Canadians get when they retire.

To get a CPP retirement pension, you normally have to have:

  • worked in Canada
  • made contributions to the CPP

Most people who get a CPP retirement pension get it when they are 65 years old. But you can start your retirement pension:

  • as early as 60, and get less money each month
  • as late as 70, and get more money each month
Canada Revenue Agency

In Immigration Law, Income Assistance

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) manages the income tax process. The CRA sends out a Notice of Assessment each year to everyone who files their tax return. The CRA is also responsible for some social benefits, like the Goods and services tax/Harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit, Canada child benefit, and child disability benefit.

common-law partner

In Income Assistance, Canada Pension Plan (CPP)

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) legislation says that a common-law partner is someone you’ve lived with in a conjugal or marriage-like relationship for at least one year. Your partner does not have to be the same sex as you.

To prove that you’re in a common-law relationship, or that you and your spouse lived in a common-law relationship before you got married, you have to fill out the: 

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