Glossary - Housing Law

discrimination

In Employment and Work, Housing Law, Human Rights, Income Assistance, Tribunals and Courts

Discrimination happens when an employer, landlord, service provider, or organization you are a member of harasses you, treats you differently or unfairly, or refuses to accommodate you because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code. Examples of personal differences include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.  

Examples of discrimination include when an employer refuses to accommodate your disability in a way that would not cause them undue hardship. Or a landlord refuses to rent to you because of your ethnic origin. Or a travel agent refuses to serve you because of your sexual orientation. Or a trade union refuses to let you join because of your disability.

evict

In Housing Law, Human Rights

Tell or force a tenant to move out. A Notice of Termination from a landlord is often called an eviction notice, even though it does not force the tenant to move out. A Landlord and Tenant Board order forcing a tenant to move out is often called an eviction order.

eviction notice

In Housing Law

To evict is to tell or force a tenant to move out. A Notice of Termination from a landlord is often called an eviction notice, even though it does not force the tenant to move out. A Landlord and Tenant Board order forcing a tenant to move out is often called an eviction order.

ex parte

In Housing Law

Ex parte is a Latin phrase that refers to a legal step done with only one side participating.

fixed-term

In Housing Law

A fixed-term tenancy is an agreement to rent a place for at least a certain length of time. The agreement is often called a lease, and the length of time is called the term. The most common term is one year, but it can be shorter or longer. When the term is over, the tenancy automatically continues as a month-to-month tenancy unless the landlord and tenant agree to another fixed term, or one of them takes legal steps to end the tenancy.

harassment

In Employment and Work, Housing Law, Human Rights

Ontario’s laws say that harassment happens when someone says or does things that they know, or should know, will bother you. This could be because what is said or done is offensive, embarrassing, humiliating, demeaning, or not welcome. This usually has to happen more than once to be considered harassment, but a single incident can be considered harassment if it causes you to feel very uncomfortable.

Harassment can include sending emails, posting materials or pictures, making jokes or other comments about:

  • your race, gender identity, gender expression, sex, disability, sexual orientation, religion, or age
  • things like the way you dress, how you talk, or your religious practices
  • in housing law, if you are receiving social assistance
  • in employment law, your record of criminal offences

Harassment like this goes against human rights laws and is a kind of discrimination. For example, if an employer harasses you because of your record of criminal offences or a landlord harasses you because you are on welfare.

Harassment is also against the laws that protect a workers’ health and safety, and the laws that protect tenants. 

interest

In Debt and Consumer Rights, Housing Law

Interest is a percentage fee that you pay to your creditor in exchange for the money they lend, or that you pay because you didn’t pay a bill on time. For example, you might be charged interest each month on a student loan, credit card balance, or mortgage. In addition to interest, you may also have to pay other late fees.

The amount of interest that is charged each month is usually a set percentage of the money you have been lent. The percentage is called an “interest rate”.  

interim order

In Housing Law

 An interim order is a temporary order made by the Landlord and Tenant Board. It usually lasts for a certain amount of time, until a certain event happens, or until the Board makes a final order in the case.

land lease home

In Housing Law

A land lease home is a home that is owned by someone who does not own the land the home is on. The owner of the home is a residential tenant who pays rent for the land. They might also pay for common areas and services, like recreational facilities or snow plowing. This arrangement is like a mobile home park except the homes are permanent structures that are not designed to be moved.

Landlord and Tenant Board

In Housing Law, Human Rights

An independent agency set up by the Ontario government to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. It is similar to a court, but less formal. It has “members” who are like judges and make decisions after hearing both sides.

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