glossary

Glossary

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This is a different name for a bail hearing. At a show cause hearing, a judge or justice of the peace decides if you can be let out of custody or must remain in custody until your trial. You will have a bail hearing if the police officer who arrested you decides to not let you leave the police station.

It is called a "show cause hearing" because, depending on the circumstances:

  • the prosecutor must explain why you should be held in custody until your trial, or
  • you must explain why your plan satisfies the court’s concerns about releasing you.
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Small Claims Court is a court that hears cases that involve sums of $25,000 or less. You can sue or be sued by a person or a business in Small Claims Court. You do not need a lawyer to go to Small Claims Court, but it is better to get legal help.

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If you disagree with a decision by Ontario Works (OW) or the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), you may be able to appeal to the Social Benefits Tribunal (SBT).

The SBT is not part of OW or ODSP and can decide that an OW or ODSP decision is wrong.

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A Social Insurance Number (SIN) is a 9-digit number that you need to work in Canada or to use government programs and get benefits.

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You may be able to appeal to the Social Security Tribunal if you don’t agree with a decision about the Canada Pension Plan, Employment Insurance, or Old Age Security.

When you appeal to the Tribunal, you start with the General Division. Then, if you think that the General Division has made an error, you may be able to appeal to the Appeal Division.

Title: sole custody
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Sole custody is a type of custody where only one parent has the right to make important decisions about how to care for and raise a child. It includes the right to make decisions about the child's health, education, and religion.

The parent with sole custody may have to discuss the issue with the other parent before making an important decision. But the parent with sole custody can make the decision even if the other parent disagrees.

Other people, for example, grandparents, can also apply to the court for custody.

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Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) say you’re a sole-support parent if both of the following are true:

  • you don’t have a spouse that OW or ODSP includes in your household
  • you do have a child or an adult child living with you and OW or ODSP includes them in your household
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You might qualify for special EI benefits if you need time off work for certain reasons. Special EI benefits include maternity, parental, sickness, compassionate care, and parents of critically ill children benefits.

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Special or extraordinary expenses are a type of child support that is paid in addition to the table amounts of monthly child support set out in the Child Support Guidelines. The table amounts cover expenses like clothes, food, and basic school supplies.

Special or extraordinary expenses cover things like daycare or university costs. These expenses must be reasonable given the family's financial situation and necessary because they are in the child's best interests. Both parents usually share these expenses in proportion to their incomes.

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To serve a document by special service means you have to give a copy of that document to your partner by either:

  • getting someone like a family member, friend, or process server to give the copy to your partner in person
  • giving the copy directly to your partner's lawyer
  • giving the copy to an adult living at the same home as your partner and also mailing a copy of the document your partner's address within one day
  • mail

There are rules about how to serve a document by special service that depend on how you serve the document. For example, you can mail the document but your partner must mail you back a special form to say that they received your document.

Some documents, such as documents that start a court case, must be served by special service. Most documents can be served by regular service.

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