glossary

Glossary

A (45) | B (19) | C (95) | D (49) | E (23) | F (16) | G (10) | H (14) | I (25) | J (6) | K (1) | L (17) | M (29) | N (21) | O (16) | P (63) | Q (2) | R (35) | S (69) | T (21) | U (11) | V (3) | W (11)
Body:

After someone becomes a permanent resident, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada gives them a permanent resident card. The card proves that the person has permanent status in Canada and includes details like their name, photograph, and date of birth.

A permanent resident card usually expires in 5 years but can be renewed.

Permanent residents who travel outside Canada need to make sure that they have their permanent resident card and that it is valid at the time they plan to return.

Body:

A person in need of protection is someone who would likely face at least one of the following risks if they had to return to their home country:

  • torture, or
  • in some cases, a risk to their life or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment
Body:

Personal information is any facts about you that identify you as a unique individual. Examples of personal information are your name, contact information, social insurance number, birth date, and address. It also includes facts about your race, religion, beliefs, age, sex, marital status, health or criminal history, education, and more.

Body:

Personal property is things you own that are not land or real estate. This includes things like cars, jewelry, furniture, and clothing.

Title: phishing
Body:

Phishing is when an identity thief pretends to be your bank, your employer, a business, or somebody else, and tries to trick you into giving them your personal information. An identity thief may use phone calls, emails, regular mail, or fake websites to get your information.

Title: plaintiff
Body:

If you sue someone in court, you are called the plaintiff. They are called the defendant.

Title: Plea bargain
Topic:
Body:

A plea bargain is an offer made by the Crown in exchange for a guilty plea. It’s called a “plea bargain” because, if you plead guilty instead of having a trial, you can ask the Crown to drop some of the charges against you, or you can ask for a lighter sentence.

Title: plea inquiry
Topic:
Body:

A plea inquiry is a series of questions that you must answer before you can plead guilty. The purpose of the plea inquiry is to show the judge that:

  • you are pleading guilty voluntarily and that no one has pressured or forced you to plead guilty
  • you understand what it means to plead guilty, for example, that you are giving up your right to a trial and to have the Crown prove the charges against you beyond a reasonable doubt
  • you are aware of what can happen to you if you plead guilty, for example, that you could go to jail and get a permanent criminal record
Title: plead guilty
Topic:
Body:

If you plead guilty, you accept responsibility for the crime you're charged with. You give up your right to a trial. The Crown won't have to prove you committed the crime.

After you plead guilty, you will have a sentencing hearing.

If you plead not guilty, you have the right to a trial where the Crown will try to prove the crime against you beyond a reasonable doubt.

Topic:
Body:

This means that you deny committing the offence(s) that you are charged with. The Crown must decide to either go to trial or to withdraw the charge.

Parlez Français