glossary

Glossary

A (45) | B (19) | C (88) | D (43) | E (21) | F (15) | G (9) | H (13) | I (25) | J (5) | K (1) | L (16) | M (28) | N (20) | O (16) | P (56) | Q (2) | R (32) | S (63) | T (20) | U (11) | V (3) | W (11)
Body:

Crown prosecutors, also known as prosecutors, Crown counsel, or the Crown, are lawyers employed by the Criminal Justice Branch of the Ministry of the Attorney General.

The Crown has a duty to make sure that all available legal proof of the facts is presented fairly. The Crown’s job is not about winning or losing. The Crown is an officer of the court, and a member of the Law Society of Ontario.

Topic:
Body:

This form may be part of your disclosure. It is also known as a charge screening form. The form tells you how the Crown plans to deal with your charges, including:

  • what kind of sentence the Crown will ask for
  • whether some of your charges will be dropped if you plead guilty early
  • whether you've been approved for diversion

This information will help you decide how you want to deal with your charges.

Title: Crown ward
Body:

A Crown ward is a child under the age of 18 years who has been taken away from their parents’ care by the court and is in the care of a children’s aid society (CAS). The CAS makes all of the decisions for the child that their parents would normally make.

Title: curfew
Topic:
Body:

A curfew means that you are required to be home at certain times, usually overnight, unless you are with your surety. You may be required to follow a curfew as a condition of your recognizance of bail.

Topic:
Body:

A custodial sentence is a sentence that involves a period of jail time.

Title: custody
Body:

Custody is the right to make important decisions about how to care for and raise a child. It includes the right to make decisions about the child's health, education, and religion. Custody is not about who the child lives with or how much time a child spends with each parent.

There are different types of custody. Sole custody means only one person has the right to make these decisions. Joint custody means two or more people have the right to make these decisions.

Other people can also apply to the court for custody, for example, grandparents.

Title: custody
Topic:
Body:

When you are in custody it means that you are detained and are not free to go. You may be held in custody by the police, or by correctional officers in jail.

A conditional sentence is also considered custody, even though the restriction on your liberty occurs in the community (usually house arrest).

Title: custody
Body:

Custody is the right of a parent to make important decisions about how to care for and raise a child. It includes the right to make decisions about the child's health, education, and religion. Custody is not about which parent the child lives with or how much time a child spends with each parent.

There are different types of custody. Sole custody means only one parent has the right to make these decisions. Joint custody means both parents have the right to make these decisions.

Other people, for example, grandparents, can also apply to the court for custody.

Title: custody order
Topic:
Body:

A custody order is a court order. It sets the terms and conditions for the people who are allowed to spend time with a child, or have custody of that child. When a person has custody of a child, they have the right to make important decisions about how to care for that child, such as the child’s education and health care.

Body:

Customary care is the type of care a First Nations, Inuk, or Métis child might get if they can’t be cared for by their parents. It means the child is cared for in a way that considers their First Nations, Inuk, or Métis community’s culture, heritage, traditions, and who they see as family.

Parlez Français