glossary

Glossary

A (45) | B (19) | C (88) | D (43) | E (21) | F (15) | G (9) | H (13) | I (25) | J (5) | K (1) | L (16) | M (28) | N (20) | O (16) | P (56) | Q (2) | R (32) | S (62) | T (20) | U (11) | V (3) | W (11)
Title: agent
Topic:
Body:

An agent is someone you ask to act on your behalf. It can be a lawyer, a paralegal, a family member, or a friend. You can ask an agent to go to court for you if the offence you were charged with carries a maximum penalty of 6 months in jail and/or a $5000 fine and is:

The person acting as your agent appears in the court as if they are you.

If your case is indictable (or hybrid and the crown has not elected), you need a "designation of counsel" in order to have your lawyer or their agent appear on your behalf.

Topic:
Body:

Aggravating factors are circumstances or facts that a judge can consider they are deciding your sentence. Aggravating factors can result in a tougher sentence. For example, assaulting a domestic partner or child can be an aggravating factor. The Crown must prove aggravating factors beyond a reasonable doubt.

Body:

All-in price advertising means that dealers cannot add additional fees on top of an advertised price. Exceptions that dealers can charge are HST, licensing fees, or fees for options that you ask for.

Title: Allowance
Topic:
Body:

The Allowance is a monthly amount that the Canadian government pays to Canadian citizens and legal residents who:

  • have a low income,
  • are 60 to 64 years old, and

are married to, or the common-law partners of, people getting Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement.

Topic:
Body:

The Allowance for the Survivor is a monthly amount that the Canadian government pays to Canadian citizens and legal residents whose spouse or common-law partner has died and who:

  • have a low income,
  • are 60 to 64 years old, and

meet the minimum residency requirements.

Body:

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) refers to different ways or processes that try to get people to agree on their legal issues without going to court. Some of these processes are collaborative family law, mediation, and arbitration.

Topic:
Body:

Alternative measures are different ways to resolve minor criminal charges. Both you and the Crown must agree to alternative measures. This can include:

  • community service
  • restitution or compensation in cash or services
  • mediation
  • special programs for counselling
  • treatment or education courses, for example, life skills, drug or alcohol treatment, and anger management

If you complete alternative measures, you won't have a trial and you will not be convicted of the crime you were charged with.

Body:

This is a formal document used to begin a proceeding in court. An information can be used to accuse a person of a criminal offence or to ask for a hearing for a peace bond.

In a criminal proceeding, the information is usually sworn by a police officer who has reasonable and probable grounds to believe the person committed a criminal offence.

In a non-criminal proceeding, a private citizen usually swears an information to ask for a peace bond against someone they have a reasonable fear of.  Private citizens can also swear informations for criminal offences.

Title: annulment
Topic:
Body:

An annulment is a court order that your marriage was not valid from the start. You might get one if, for example, your partner was still married to someone else when they married you.

It is rare to get an annulment to legally end a marriage. Most of the time you need to get a divorce to legally end a marriage.

Title: appeal
Topic:
Body:

To appeal means to ask a judge or someone with more power to review a decision that you don't agree with.

Other parties who are affected by the decision can also appeal.

Parlez Français