glossary

Glossary

A (45) | B (19) | C (92) | D (47) | E (21) | F (16) | G (9) | H (13) | I (23) | J (6) | K (1) | L (16) | M (28) | N (21) | O (16) | P (58) | Q (2) | R (34) | S (65) | T (20) | U (11) | V (3) | W (11)
Title: custody
Body:

Custody is the right to make important decisions about how to care for and raise a child. It includes the right to make decisions about the child's health, education, and religion. Custody is not about who the child lives with or how much time a child spends with each parent.

There are different types of custody. Sole custody means only one person has the right to make these decisions. Joint custody means two or more people have the right to make these decisions.

Other people can also apply to the court for custody, for example, grandparents.

Title: custody
Topic:
Body:

When you are in custody it means that you are detained and are not free to go. You may be held in custody by the police, or by correctional officers in jail.

A conditional sentence is also considered custody, even though the restriction on your liberty occurs in the community (usually house arrest).

Title: custody
Body:

Custody is the right of a parent to make important decisions about how to care for and raise a child. It includes the right to make decisions about the child's health, education, and religion. Custody is not about which parent the child lives with or how much time a child spends with each parent.

There are different types of custody. Sole custody means only one parent has the right to make these decisions. Joint custody means both parents have the right to make these decisions.

Other people, for example, grandparents, can also apply to the court for custody.

Title: custody order
Topic:
Body:

A custody order is a court order. It sets the terms and conditions for the people who are allowed to spend time with a child, or have custody of that child. When a person has custody of a child, they have the right to make important decisions about how to care for that child, such as the child’s education and health care.

Body:

Customary care is the type of care a First Nations, Inuk, or Métis child might get if they can’t be cared for by their parents. It means the child is cared for in a way that considers their First Nations, Inuk, or Métis community’s culture, heritage, traditions, and who they see as family.

Topic:
Body:

Customer Service Resolution is a way to solve a complaint that you have with the police. The Office of the Independent Police Review Director decides whether a complaint should be resolved using Customer Service Resolution.

The process usually takes less than 45 days and is used for less serious complaints. For example, it might be used if the police were not polite or treated you unfairly.

You and the police officers or police service work together to:

  • understand what happened
  • share concerns
  • take steps to solve the problems

Parlez Français