glossary

Glossary

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A supervision order is when the court decides that your child can live with you, another parent, or a caregiver, but that the Children’s Aid Society has to regularly check that your child is being cared for.

A supervision order can last between 3 and 12 months. And it can include a number of conditions, such as you:

  • get tested for drugs regularly
  • go for counselling
  • go to parenting classes

 

Title: surety
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This is a person who helps you get bail by agreeing to supervise you while you are on bail. This includes making sure you do not commit any more crimes and that you go to court as required. A surety must pledge money as security for your release. If you fail to comply with a condition of your bail, your surety may lose the money they pledged.

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A surety warrant is a type of arrest warrant that is issued when your surety cancels your bail. A surety warrant gives the police the power to arrest you. Your surety can cancel your bail at any time.

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Surplus Income Guidelines say how much money someone who’s filed for bankruptcy or their family can earn before they have to make surplus income payments. The money that a family or person makes over the guidelines is called surplus income.

The guidelines change each year based on what the government sets as the cost of living.

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When you file for bankruptcy, you may have to make what are called monthly “surplus income payments” if you or your family earn more money than what the Surplus Income Guidelines say you can make.

These payments go to a Licensed Insolvency Trustee, who uses them to pay your creditors.

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A suspended sentence is a type of sentence that you might get after you're convicted of a crime. If you get a suspended sentence, you will:

  • be on probation for up to 3 years,
  • have a permanent criminal record, and
  • not have to go to jail as part of your sentence

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