glossary

Glossary

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Title: abandoned
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The Refugee Board can decide at a special hearing that a refugee claimant has “abandoned” their claim. This means that the claimant loses the right to make their claim. This could happen if a claimant does not follow all the rules about making a refugee claim. For example, if they do not file their Basis of Claim Form on time, do not show up for a hearing, or do not contact the Refugee Board when asked to do so.

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The Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) can decide, at a special hearing, that a refugee claimant has "abandoned" their claim. This means that the claimant loses the right to make their claim. This could happen if a claimant does not follow all the rules about making a refugee claim. For example, they don't file their Basis of Claim Form on time, don't show up for a hearing, or don't reply when the IRB asks them to.

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An absolute discharge is a type of sentence. Absolute discharge means that the court found you guilty, but decided not to punish you in any other way. You don’t get a criminal record. Absolute discharges are automatically removed from the Canadian Police Information Center computer system 1 year after the court’s decision.

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A trial for an absolute jurisdiction offence is always held in the Ontario Court of Justice. You do not have an election. Absolute jurisdiction offences are listed in section 553 of the Criminal Code. Some examples include:

  • theft of something valued $5000 or less
  • fraud under $5000
  • failure to comply with recognizance
  • failure to comply with probation order
Title: access
Body:

Access is the time a parent spends with a child they usually don't live with. Access can be on a strict schedule, such as every other weekend, or on a flexible schedule. In some cases, a parent might have supervised access where someone else, for example a Children’s Aid Society worker or relative, watches the visit.

Other people can also apply to the court for access, for example, grandparents.

Access also includes the right to get information on the child's health, education, and well-being. Getting information is not the same thing as making major decisions about the child.

Title: accommodate
Body:

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal differences include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

Title: accommodation
Body:

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers, landlords, and service providers must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

 The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability. 

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship. 

Title: acquittal
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An acquittal means that the court found you not guilty.

Title: actus reus
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Actus reus is one of the two elements of a crime the Crown must prove beyond a reasonable doubt to prove your guilt. It refers to the guilty act.

There are two ways you can commit a guilty act. You can:

  • do something that is against the law, or
  • fail to do something required by the law
Title: adjourn
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To adjourn a case means to re-schedule it to continue at some later time. This can be as early as the next day, or as late as months later, depending on the reason for the adjournment. This is not the same as a recess. A recess is when the court takes a break but comes back the same day.

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