glossary

Glossary

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Title: port of entry
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A port of entry is a place where people can enter Canada. Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) decides if a person can come into the country.

Ports of entry include international airports, land border crossings, such as border crossings from the United States, and maritime ports, such as the ports at Vancouver and Halifax.

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If you don't pay what a court order says you owe right away, you will have to pay extra money called post-judgement interest. The interest continues to increase from the time that the judgment is made until you pay all the money that you owe.

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Postpaid services are cellphone services that you pay for after you use the service. You pay for the amount of service that you used since your last payment. Most monthly cellphone contracts are postpaid. If you have a monthly plan that you pay for after you use the services, you are using postpaid services.

Some prepaid services also have monthly contracts.

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A Power of Attorney for Personal Care is a legal document that lets you name someone to make decisions for you if you become mentally incapable. It is sometimes called a "personal power of attorney".

You're called the grantor. The person you name is called your attorney.

Your attorney can make:

  • decisions about your personal care, such as where you live, what you eat, getting dressed, washing and having a bath, and staying safe
  • decisions about your health care that deal with:
    • health-care treatments
    • moving into a long-term care home
    • personal care services in a long-term care home
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A Power of Attorney for Property is a legal document that lets you name someone to deal with your money and property. You're called the grantor. The person you name is called your attorney.

Your attorney can make decisions, such as: 

  • doing your banking
  • signing cheques
  • buying, selling, or leasing real estate
  • buying consumer goods and services

They cannot:

  • make or change your will
  • make or change who's a beneficiary on your insurance policy or a registered plan, such as your registered retirement savings plan (RRSP)
  • make a new Power of Attorney for you
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Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) is a process that reviews the risk a person would face if sent back to their country. Most people who apply successfully for PRRA become protected persons.

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You, the Crown, or the judge can ask for a pre-sentence report. It is written by a probation officer. The report helps the judge understand your background, current situation, and future opportunities before the judge sentences you.

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If you're charged with a crime and spend time in jail, the time you spend in jail before being found guilty is called pre-trial custody. If you're convicted of a crime and sentenced, the judge may give you credit for your time in pre-trial custody. This means that your sentence could be reduced by a certain amount for every day you were in pre-trial custody.

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Motions are used by the Crown and defence lawyer to request that the court do something. These are applications that occur before the trial.  They usually require written materials and attendance at court to argue the motion.

Pre-trial motions are argued once it has been decided that a case is going to trial. Some common pre-trial motions request the court to:

  • allow or exclude specific items of evidence
  • allow or prevent witnesses from testifying
  • change the location of the trial (change of venue)
  • stay the charge
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A preauthorized debit is when you give permission to your bank to automatically pay a person or business out of your account on a certain date. For example, you might pay your phone bill or car loan through a preauthorized debit. A preauthorized debit is sometimes called a preauthorized payment.  It can also be used to refer to post-dated cheques you give someone to cash on a future date.

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