glossary

Glossary

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Title: accommodate
Topic:
Body:

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers and landlords must do what they can to remove barriers that cause barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship.

Title: accommodation
Body:

Ontario’s Human Rights Code says that employers and landlords must do what they can to remove barriers that cause people to be treated differently because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code.

 The legal word for this is accommodation. Examples of personal personal include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability. 

This could mean doing things differently for you so that you are treated equally. For example, you might need a wheelchair ramp to get inside a building. Or you might not be able to wear the same uniform as other workers because of your religion.

But an employer or landlord might not have to do something if they can prove that it will cause them undue hardship. 

Title: application
Body:

A way to start a case at a court or tribunal, or to ask a court or tribunal to make a decision about a dispute. For example, if a landlord wants a tenant to move out and the tenant does not move, the landlord can make an application to the Landlord and Tenant Board. Or if a tenant can't get their landlord to do needed repairs, the tenant can make an application to the Board. Application can also refer to the actual form or document used to start a case.

Title: disability
Body:

In Ontario's human rights laws, the term disability includes many conditions. For example, a disability can be a physical condition, a mental condition, a learning disability, a developmental disability, or a mental illness. Disability also includes being addicted to or dependent on drugs or alcohol.

You could be born with a disability. Or, you could have a disability because you were sick or injured.

Body:

Discrimination happens when an employer, landlord, service provider, or organization you are a member of harasses you, treats you differently or unfairly, or refuses to accommodate you because of personal differences that are listed in the Human Rights Code. Examples of personal differences include a person’s ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or disability.  

Examples of discrimination include when an employer refuses to accomodate your disability in a way that would not cause them undue hardship. Or a landlord refuses to rent to you because of your ethnic origin. Or a travel agent refuses to serve you because of your sexual orientation. Or a trade union refuses to let you join because of your disability.

Title: evict
Body:

Tell or force a tenant to move out. A Notice of Termination from a landlord is often called an eviction notice, even though it does not force the tenant to move out. A Landlord and Tenant Board order forcing a tenant to move out is often called an eviction order.

Title: harassment
Topic:
Body:

Ontario’s laws say that harassment happens when someone says or does things that they know, or should know, will bother you. This could be because what is said or done is offensive, embarrassing, humiliating, demeaning, or not welcome. This usually has to happen more than once to be considered harassment, but a single incident can be considered harassment if it causes you to feel very uncomfortable.

Harassment can include sending emails, posting materials or pictures, making jokes or other comments about:

  • your race, gender identity, gender expression, sex, disability, sexual orientation, religion, or age
  • things like the way you dress, how you talk, or your religious practices
  • in housing law, if you are receiving social assistance
  • in employment law, your record of criminal offences

Harassment like this goes against human rights laws and is a kind of discrimination. For example, if an employer harasses you because of your record of criminal offences or a landlord harasses you because you are on welfare.

Harassment is also against the laws that protect a workers’ health and safety, and the laws that protect tenants. 

Body:

An independent agency set up by the Ontario government to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. It is similar to a court, but less formal. It has "members" who are like judges and make decisions after hearing both sides.

Topic:
Body:

A mediated agreement is an agreement that 2 parties make with the help of a third person called a mediator during mediation. If the parties make a mediated agreement on some or all of their issues, they do not need to have a hearing at a court or tribunal about the things they have agreed on. 

Title: mediation
Topic:
Body:

When 2 parties don’t agree on something, a third person called a mediator can talk to both of them to try to help them find a solution they can agree on. This is called mediation. A mediator is neutral, which means they don’t take sides. They don’t have the power to decide anything or force anyone to agree to anything.

If the mediation process works, both parties make an agreement on some or all of their issues. This means they do not need to have a hearing at a court or tribunal on the things they agree on.

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