glossary

Glossary

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A common-law relationship is one where partners of the same or opposite sex live together in a marriage-like relationship, without being married. This is sometimes called "cohabiting". You don't have to live together for a certain amount of time to be in a common-law relationship. But the law gives different rights to common-law partners depending on how long they've lived together or whether they have a child together.

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People who get Ontario Works (OW) assistance may have to do community placements.

Community placements are sometimes called “community participation” or “voluntary placement”.

People in community placements work at non-profit, community, or public organizations. Examples of these types of organizations are schools, daycare centres, food banks, libraries, and community centres.

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A Community Treatment Order (CTO) is an official order from a doctor that allows a person who has a serious mental disorder to be treated for it while living at home. Without a CTO, that person would be forced to live in a psychiatric facility and be treated there.

Title: complainant
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This is a person who alleges that they are the victim of a criminal offence. For example, in an assault case, the complainant is the person who says they were assaulted.

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A conditional discharge is a type of sentence. A conditional discharge means that the court found you guilty, but you don’t get a criminal record. Part of your sentence will include probation  for up to 3 years. Your probation will require you to follow specific conditions. If you don’t, you might get a criminal record and a tougher sentence or be charged with another criminal offence. A sentence is the punishment that the court gives you if you’re found guilty. Conditional discharges are automatically removed from the Canadian Police Information Centre computer system 3 years after the court’s decision.

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Getting a conditional sentence means that you don't serve your sentence in custody, for example, in jail. You serve your sentence in the community and there are strict conditions that you must follow. Some people call this "house arrest".

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A conditional sentence is a type of sentence that you might get if you're convicted of a crime. If you get a conditional sentence, you don't go to jail. Instead, you serve time in the community on house arrest.

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A confirmation of permanent residence is the document that proves you’re a permanent resident. You get this document when you land in Canada as a permanent resident. People who became permanent residents before July 2002 got a document called a record of landing.

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A conjugal partner is someone who you’ve had a conjugal or marriage-like relationship with for at least one year. They don’t have to be the same sex as you.

A conjugal relationship does not have to include living together. But if you could have lived together and chose not to, it can be difficult to convince Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada that your relationship is conjugal.

Title: consent order
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A consent order is a type of court order that is based what the parties in a court case agree to.

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