glossary

Glossary

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Civil forfeiture is a process in civil court where a judge decides on a balance of probabilities whether or not the police have to return items that they took from you. The judge will decide that the police can keep the items, if it’s “more likely than not” that the item was:

  • bought with money made from a crime, or
  • used to commit a crime.
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A claim number is the unique number that the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) gives to each injury you report. It’s on the first letter that you get from the WSIB and all other WSIB documents about your injury.

Title: Claimant
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A claimant is somebody who is getting or claiming EI benefits.

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A clearance certificate is a document that an estate trustee gets from Canada Revenue Agency. It confirms that all money the person who died owed to the Canada Revenue Agency has been paid.

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When you apply for a job or volunteer position, you might be asked for a criminal record check. Instead of a criminal record check, you may be able to get a clearance letter from your local police.

A clearance letter confirms that as of the date of the letter, you don’t have any:

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At the end of your trial, you get a chance to briefly tell the judge why you should get the court order you're asking for. This is called a closing statement. Your closing statement should be based on: 

  • what you or other witnesses said
  • the documents used as evidence
  • family law rules and laws

You cannot talk about any new information that wasn’t used as evidence in the trial.

Title: co-accused
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The co-accused are other people who are charged on an information with you. They may or may not be charged with the same offences as you. But their charges are related to yours. Their charges and yours likely involve the same incident.

Title: co-owner
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A co-owner of a debt is someone who owns part of the money that a person is owed. For example, two people who share a joint bank account are co-owners of the debt.

Title: co-sign
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To co-sign is to sign a legal agreement together with another person for a loan or other debt. When you do this you are jointly responsible for paying the debt. For example, if you co-sign a lease, you are responsible for paying all of the rent, even if the other person doesn’t pay their part.

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A code of ethics is a set of rules that say what members of an organization or profession can do, and how they are supposed to behave and run their business. For example, a non-profit credit counsellor will protect a client’s privacy and not share information about a client without getting permission.

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