My employer says I’m suspended without pay. What does this mean?

Take steps to protect your rights

If your employer asks you to sign something

Your employer might ask you to sign something admitting you did something wrong. If your employer insists that you sign, you can write: “I'm signing here only to admit that I have been shown this document.”

You can also send a letter or email to your employer to confirm that your signature does not mean you agree with what's in the document.

Keep your own records of events

If you end up losing your job, you might decide to take legal steps against your employer to get what they owe you.

If you need evidence about what happened, it's helpful if you have notes. And it's best to make notes right after things happen while your memory of the events is clear.

If you email the notes to yourself, this can help show when the notes were made.

If your employer says you did something wrong and you disagree, you may want to record your version of what happened. You can put this in a letter or an email that you send to your employer. Keep a copy for yourself.

But, if you can, get legal advice before you send anything. You don't want to say something that your employer can use against you.

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