3. Calculate each partner's net family property

We're married. How do we divide our property and debts if we separate or divorce?
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3. Calculate each partner's net family property

Use the information in your financial statement to calculate your net family property (NFP). NFP tells you how much money you are worth at the end of your relationship after taking into account what you brought into the marriage.

To calculate your NFP, you first add together all assets and subtract all debts that you had at the end of your relationship or your separation. This is usually on the day you and your partner separated. Then you also subtract all assets less all debts you had on the day you married.

Remember that some assets or debts are treated differently in this calculation. For example, some gifts and inheritances are not included.

There are instructions on the Form 13.1: Financial Statement (Property and Support Claims) that tell you what items to add and subtract.

Your partner calculates their NFP the same way.

Example calculation of NFP for each partner

Married partner A

Now (Separation Date) = assets - debts

$100,000

Then (Marriage Date) = assets - debts

$20,000

Now - Then

$80,000

NFP for Married partner A is $80,000

 

Married partner B

Now (Separation Date) = assets - debts

$55,000

Then (Marriage Date) = assets - debts

$25,000

Now - Then

$30,000

NFP for Married partner B is $30,000

 

If your NFP calculation is a negative amount, your NFP is considered to be zero.

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Reviewed: July 31, 2017

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